Adopted Children and Their Challenges – An Interview with Kathy

 

 

Adopted Children and Their Challenges - An Interview with Kathy - Anchor Of Promise

 

Today we are going to meet Kathy.  She shares her story about the challenges that came in her life through adoption.  Maybe you will find your story within hers.  May you also find hope and encouragement too.  

 

Adoption has been a true dear to the heart passion for you and your husband.  You have adopted four times domestically and internationally.  What were the ages of your children when you adopted them?  

Our first son was a  domestic adoption and he was 3 days old, next daughter was International adoption and she was 23 months, then another international adoption and he was 16 months, our youngest daughter we adopted as a domestic adoption at 9years, 11 months old.

Certain adoptions pose different challenges such as age range, living in an orphanage or foster home and even second chance adoptions.  What challenges were you faced with? 

I think all of my children have had many challenges and still continue into adulthood. My daughter adopted from Ukraine was institutionalized from birth. She was diagnosed with emotional deprivation. She was unable to give or receive affection for her first year, and her emotions were always guarded, and she continues to struggle to this day. She has struggled with making deep, lasting, trusting relationships. My boys both had issues related to delays in learning. There is no way to know if there was a direct correlation to their adoptions but I imagine so. Our daughter who was adopted at 9years 11 months, as an interrupted adoption, we were the second family that had adopted her since she was brought to America from Russia when she was 5 years old. Her primary diagnosis was attachment disorder. She was put in a Russian  orphanage at age 4, adopted and brought to America at age 5, was treated for attachment disorder, and the family felt as though they were no longer able to handle the challenges of keeping her in their home. They had a list of issues that they claimed were were so severe that they had made a decision to have her institutionalized in the state the family was living. We intervened and adopted her. We have had many challenges in parenting her. I could write a book with her challenges alone. I think another challenge for adoptive children that is greater than for biological children is the question of identity-Who am

Adoptive children typically don’t look like anyone else in the family – it becomes obvious to them at a young age that  they don’t fit like biological children. My older son had a lot of interest in knowing things about his biological parents. Sometimes information about an adoptive child’s biological parents leaves them feeling disappointed as often the parents have lived a less than praiseworthy life, which was the case in 3 out of my 4 children. With my kids we tried to steer them to God. Their essential identity is found in what God says about them. Point them to Christ. Continue reading