5 Things to Do When Your Teen is Diagnosed with a Mental Illness

5 Things to Do When Your Teen is Diagnosed with a Mental Illness - Anchor Of Promise

by Julia Greif

Watching your child/teen being diagnosed and living with a mental illness is hard. This is something no parent wants to experience.  In fact, after being diagnosed many parents feel lost as to what is next.

There are many things to do and not to do when you’re dealing with any mental illness. As someone who was diagnosed in my early twenties, I want to encourage parents by bringing attention to the things they CAN do.

My family (like many families) didn’t know what to do or what to say.  Because of this, it broke and hurt me in ways that made living with a mental illness worse. So here are some words of wisdom that I want to share with you today as you guide your teen through their mental illness. Continue reading

Round #89

Round #89 - Anchor Of Promise
Exhausted. Weary. Stressed. How much more does this have to go on? How many more rounds does it take before my kid can finally be set free from this madness?

You’ve evaluated your options. You have done your research. You might even have great counsel. But in the end, there is still a battle within your teen that lingers on.

You know your stuff when it comes to programs and talking to the experts. You have so much knowledge that you could actually teach a class on the type of crisis your teen and other teens like yours are dealing with. However, you are still in the same place you were a month ago, 6 months ago, or even a year or more ago. Continue reading

Pride Goeth Before the Fall of Your Children

Pride Goeth Before the Fall of Your Children - Anchor Of Promise
Today, many parents rather be prideful, choose denial or keep secrets than consider first the welfare of their teens. I’m not talking about those who would normally feel embarrassed or feel shame about their family’s situation or too scared to talk about it. But I am talking about those who had been offered help from different sources and yet refuse to obtain and listen to that help.

Most notably, by looking at the case of the Sandy Cove shooter whose own mother “chose” not to confront the issues at hand, but instead accommodated those issues. And because of how it was handled, years later the most horrific shooting occurred. This is not just my opinion but by reports of those who are in the medical/psychological field along with documentation from many witnesses that were close to the family.

What I have been hearing and seeing lately is how many parents have similar stories (maybe not as severe) and are following the same footsteps as that mother who in the end paid the final penalty when the son shot her to death. There were no winners in that situation, only losses, too many losses.

Several years ago, I met a family who has a son. They were the parents of many children, but this one particular child was the youngest and also the most rebellious and hurting. After having some get-togethers and a lot of observations, a discussion came up in which I was able to voice some of my concerns that were very valid. Continue reading

There Are Always Signs But Do We Always See Them?

There Are Always Signs, But Do We Always See Them - Anchor Of Promise

In a recent interview with Barbara Walters, Peter Rodger, the father of Elliot Rodger who killed 6 and wounded 13 others, said that he never saw the signs that something was severely wrong.

Peter and his wife truly believed with all of their heart that their son’s issues would not take him to the mental state that he had succumbed to. And I believe that to be true to a degree. With Elliot living on his own, away from daily interactions with his parents, it was even more difficult to diagnose how Elliot’s mind had digressed.

However, I must say this. The signs were there and all along, even going back to the age of 7 when his parents divorced. That was the ultimate turning point in this young man’s life in which his parents had noticed the change, enough to seek help for him. Did his parents understand the severity of Elliot’s issues? No, not to the degree that ended his life and the life of others.

If parents don’t know what they are looking for or what the signs could easily turn into if not carefully monitored, it is easy for them to not see the troubling issues that were obviously forming for some time in this young man’s life. Many parents think that because there are no outward signs such as rebellious behavior or acting out, then there is nothing wrong altogether. But the truth is, that doesn’t matter when it comes to a significant and serious psychological issue. The only way of knowing for sure is acting on what you do know to be wrong and to get your child diagnosed. Continue reading